Talking Turkey

Most Americans probably know little about Turkey, yet it is one of the most important members of NATO.  It was a key ally throughout the Cold War, bordering the Soviet Union.  Turkey was important enough that as a condition for removing missiles from Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Soviet Union got the US to restrict what planes and weapons it based in Turkey.

And Turkey may be even more important now.  Turkey is the only Muslim-majority member of NATO and it borders Syria, Iraq and Iran. Continue reading “Talking Turkey”

“We Will Always Have Paris”…But Should We?

For ardent environmentalists, the topic of ‘climate change’ is one of the most impassioned areas of political thought. It has become a position held with religious zealotry in certain circles, with adherence to a strict dogma and any thought of opposition to the fundamental belief is considered almost blasphemous. It is considered by passionate adherents to be ‘science’ and even the slightest disagreement is a sign of ignorance and analogous to believing the earth is flat.

It is not surprising, then, that President Trump caused quite a controversy when he announced yesterday that he was withdrawing from the Paris Climate Treaty,

So what is the debate and why would the President pull the largest economic power in the world out of the Treaty? To fully answer that question, we have to look at the overall issue of ‘climate change’ and then at the Paris Treaty itself. Let’s take these in order. Continue reading ““We Will Always Have Paris”…But Should We?”

Socialism and the Poor in Venezuela

Hugo Chavez took power in Venezuela in 1999, on promises to do more to help the country’s poor.  He brought a growing snowball of socialist economic policies with him that have continued since then.  Venezuela has long been a member of OPEC, the world’s oil cartel, and has among the largest oil reserves in the hemisphere.  In 2001, Venezuela was the largest economy in South America.  Soon after taking office Chavez began nationalizing companies, including the nation’s oil companies, and began using the money from oil production to pay for subsidies for consumer goods that have grown over time, for everything from food to diapers. Continue reading “Socialism and the Poor in Venezuela”